Dolores Gordon
RC 1967 - 1969
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Having studied  Ballet, Tap and Jazz from valued teachers in St. Louis, MO,  moving from a small town in southern Illinois to NYC was a culmination of a lifetime dream.  Living at the Rehearsal Club was such a bonus!  I had actually never heard of the Rehearsal Club, but immediately upon arrival I visited the AGVA office and was directed to apply for residence at the Rehearsal Club.

While there I met so many lovely women.  One, Odette,  and I have stayed in touch over the years.  Sandy Duncan was at the Rehearsal Club at the time.   I remember her as such a friendly person.  Always showing interest in others.
 
I participated in a production with the St. Louis Civic Ballet and I worked with the Bob Arlen review for a few years and then married and moved to Canada.  While there I taught Ballet, Tap and Jazz for many years.  Returning to the United States I started a new career teaching Tai Chi!!!
 
It's 2:30 Tuesday afternoon at the Mascoutah Senior Center.  Dolores Gordon, a native of Cahokia and  a longtime ballet, tap and jazz dance instructor, starts some soothing music and calls for the lights to go down in the dining hall.  A casually-dressed group of students line up and follow along as Dolores begins a series of easy motions, designed over the centuries in ancient China, to relax, balance and stretch muscles and limbs.

Originally a martial art, tai-chi (shortened from tai-chi chuan) has been scientifically studied at places like the Harvard Medical School, and has been shown to relieve chronic pain and to reduce stress, blood pressure, anxiety and depression.  Improvements in flexibility, muscle strength, balance and sleep quality have also been reported.

Betty Waeltz, from Belleville, reports her surgeon is "very happy" with the progress she's made since major shoulder surgery a year ago.  David Dumstorff, a former heavy equipment operator from Mascoutah, spoke about how tai-chi relaxes the upper-body tension he suffers from, even as he uses his oxygen machine while in class.

For one hour, Dolores gently moves her group without stopping, although everyone can do the movements at their own pace in a non-competitive environment.  And, with numerous certifications in various forms of tai-chi over the past 15 years, she can answer most any question a neophyte would have.  
 
Mascoutah Herald, 2017 
by Bill Setnor (excerpt)